MAJOR: NUTRITION
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Nutrition is an integrative science with the overall objective of improving the health and well-being of individuals and groups. Nutrition students not only become proficient in the roles of electrons, atoms, molecules, genes, cells and organs, but also complex organisms. Nutrition students examine the links between life science and health, behavior, education, population, culture, and economics.

There are six specialization options for the Bachelor of Science in nutrition. All options combine a prescribed common core of science and nutrition courses with additional coursework in the area of specialization.

Students can also pursue a Bachelor of Science and Arts degree program in nutrition. The BSA is a cross-disciplinary degree for students interested in combining core sciences with coursework in the fine arts, liberal arts, communications, or business.

This undergraduate training will prepare students for careers in industry, research and provide a solid foundation for further study in graduate school.

Declare This Major

Step 1: Internal transfer students must apply to the College of Natural Sciences prior to completing 60 hours or four long semesters at UT. Applications are due to the College of Natural Sciences in the spring. Learn more about the college's internal transfer requirements.

Step 2: Once accepted into the College of Natural Sciences, all students will start as entry-level nutrition majors until they successfully complete the entry-level requirements. Upon completion of the major prerequisites, students will be eligible to choose the nutrition option they wish to pursue.

Prospective University of Texas at Austin students should visit UT Admissions to learn about the application process and how to declare a major.

Required Courses

For information on required courses, students can view the Nutrition degree plans for each track and degree option.

Specializations

BS in Nutrition

All NTR students will study principles in biochemistry, biology, physiology, sociology and psychology as they pertain to nutrition.

Departmental Honors as well as special honors programs are available for NTR majors.

BSA in Nutrition

Students can also pursue a Bachelor of Science and Arts degree program in Nutrition. The BSA is a cross-disciplinary degree for students interested in combining core sciences with coursework in the fine arts, liberal arts, communications, or business.

Students pursuing the BSA in nutrition degree do not choose a specific specialization. In addition to major coursework, BSA students must complete 12 hours of 'Language, Arts, and Culture' coursework from areas such as fine arts, humanities, social and behavioral sciences, and foreign language or culture.

BSA students are also required to complete a minor or transcript-recognized certificate program.

What can I do with this major?

Wondering how you'd turn this major into a career? Remember: your major does not always determine your career path. Career counseling and assessments at the Vick Center can help you explore.

Major ≠ Career

Graduates with this major pursue many different careers, depending on their interests and experiences. Make yourself more marketable by complementing this major with part-time work, volunteering, internships, a certificate program, or graduate school.

Experience + Degree = Career

The Career Service Offices in your college can help you with internships and jobs. They work closely with employers to help students prepare for career opportunities. Read a few inspiring stories by professionals whose experiences led to great careers.

Skills

Students in the nutrition major develop:

  • Principles in biochemistry, biology, physiology, sociology and psychology as they pertain to nutrition
  • Behavioral and clinical nutrition and food systems management
  • Basic business principles to prepare for careers in food industry sales and customer support
  • Knowledge of nutrition issues in other countries through a study abroad experience
  • A broad foundation relating to practicing nutrition in another culture